Lex et Orbis is a column concerned with use of the law as a tool for strengthening free institutions. It seeks to bring about a better understanding of the legal principles that apply to international and domestic issues. This program delivers thoughtful, balanced, and persuasive articles that are accessible to people without a legal background.

Lex et Orbis Sabrina Natale

Victory by any means necessary? Part II: Challenges and non-state actors

What are the challenges associated with upholding the rules of war in armed conflicts? Sabrina Natale analyzes Canada’s role in combatting illegal war tactics and upholding the rules of war, and what roles non-state actors play in addressing contemporary war crimes.

Lex et Orbis Sabrina Natale

Victory by any means? Part 1: Rules of War & Humanitarian Law

In times of war and armed conflicts, what are the legal and ethical standards that must be upheld to ensure the dignity and human rights of all peoples? In Part 1 of this article, Sabrina Natale provides an analysis into the ICRC rules of war and International Humanitarian Law.

Elise Wagner Lex et Orbis The Middle East and North Africa

Defying International Law, Syria and the Islamic State Accused of Using Chemical Weapons

Despite promising to destroy its stockpile of chemical weapons, Syria has once again been accused of using the banned arms against its civilians. The Islamic State has also been accused and these accusations were levelled in a new UN report released earlier this month.

Elise Wagner Lex et Orbis

The History of Defining Justice: How International Law Is Being Used to Right Past Wrongs

Palestine has indicated that it wants to take legal action against Britain for the 1917 Balfour Declaration that lead to the creation of Israel. As historical reparations cases become more common, what does this mean for our understanding of international justice?

Elise Wagner Lex et Orbis

Growing Pains: The International Criminal Court, the African Union, and the Kampala Accords

The successful ratification of the Kampala Accords means the International Criminal Court will be able to charge leaders with the crime of aggression but trouble continues for the court as member states of the African Union publicly voice their discontent.