The ‘NATO Operations’ program provides historical and analytical commentary on missions and operations conducted by NATO—both past and present, and around the world. It looks at events that shape global politics, and provides information on a variety of countries and events that affect their futures. When probing into some of the most influential events in modern history, our enthusiastic group of writers are always excited and ready to provide interesting and objective insights to our readers.

Elliott Simpson NATO and Canada NATO Operations

Last In, First Out: Two Decades in Afghanistan

Bagram Air Base – once the bastion of coalition forces in Afghanistan – is now empty of U.S. and NATO troops, bringing an effective end to their presence in the country. Elliott Simpson reflects on what should be acknowledged, and hopefully learned from their efforts over the past 20 years.

Eric Jackson NATO and Canada NATO Operations

Today’s Reporter, Tomorrow’s Historian: The Story of Sgt Donnie McDonald and Operation REASSURANCE

Canadians are proud contributors to international peace and security. Eric Jackson tells the story of Sgt Donnie McDonald, an Imagery Technician deployed to Latvia for over seven months as part of Operation REASSURANCE.

Canada China Climate Change Defence Spending Defense Diplomatic Relations Eric Jackson Europe NATO and Canada NATO Operations The United States of America Western Europe

Prepping for 2030: The Young Leaders’ Perspective on NATO’s Future

Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg is set to outline the NATO 2030 initiative to the 30 NATO member countries next week. In prep, Eric Jackson highlights the NATO 2030 Young Leaders’ recommendations on how to strengthen the Alliance.

Eric Jackson NATO and Canada NATO Operations

Political Accounting: Rethinking NATO’s ‘2 percent’ Rule

Is the ‘2 percent’ rule an effective way to measure a member State’s commitment to NATO? Eric Jackson explores how political manipulation in current defence spending misrepresents a nation’s military readiness and suggests a broader definition for security expenditures.