Women in Security covers a wide-range of issues as it explores the link between women, security, and development. As a forum to stimulate discussion and instructive debates, the NATO Association of Canada will examine the ways in which women both contribute to and are the focus of Canadian and NATO defence and security initiatives. This program also offers a critical look at the structures and institutions that shape the role of women in security at home and abroad.

Women in Security

The Long and Winding Road: NATO and the UN’s Approach to Women and R2P

In this article, Nicole Dougherty, explores how NATO and the UN have approached the topic of Women and the Responsibility to Protect (R2P). The article explores how the organizations have created policies and practices meant to address this issue and provides some policy suggestions on how they can improve them in the future.

Cyber Security and Emerging Threats Women in Security

The Female Qur’an Experts Helping to Fight Radical Islam

Author Mary Peplinski showcases a unique program in Morocco where female Quranic scholars are helping to counter radicalization. She explains why other countries should look at developing similar programs to increase the effectiveness of national CVE strategies.

Canadian Armed Forces Cyber Security and Emerging Threats Uncategorized Women in Security

The Danger of Gender Stereotyping Canada’s ‘Jihadi Brides’

In this article, author Mary Peplinski explores the consequences gender stereotyping may have for national security and counterterrorism efforts in Canada. The article will focus specifically on the cases of women who are trying to return to Canada after leaving to join ISIS.

Women in Security

Gender Based Analysis Plus (GBA+) at CSIS: What about the Plus?

Despite the longstanding nature of GBA+, there remains no concrete method that can be used to evaluate its implementation into job sectors across Canada, though despite this lack of enforcement, the concept of GBA+ has indeed seen significant improvements in certain workplaces, such as the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS).