Justin Michael James Dell, B.A. (Hon.), M.A., M.A. has been affiliated with the NATO Association of Canada since 2018. He served as a Program Editor for NATO Operations, then as a Senior Editor, before being made Co-Editor-in-Chief in 2022. He has assisted in architecting the NATO Association’s massive online course designed to introduce Canadian high school students to the concept of the rules-based international order and the work done on its behalf by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. He holds a master's degree in history from the University of Guelph and a master's degree in global governance from the University of Waterloo. He is currently studying for his PhD in global governance at the Balsillie School at the University of Waterloo, with a focus on conflict and security. He can be reached at jdell@balsillieschool.ca
Canadian Armed Forces

What’s the Deal with the F-35?

Canada’s relationship with the F-35 Lightning II Joint-Strike Fighter is a long and complicated one. In this article, Justin Dell provides an overview of this chapter in the history of Canadian military procurement, underscores some of the implications of Canada’s actions towards this weapons program, and argues that the Canadian government has made the wrong decision in turning its back on the aircraft.

NATO and Canada NATO Operations Uncategorized

The United States Stands Alone: A Review of “Red Dawn” (1984)

In this film analysis, Justin Dell looks at the alternative history flick, “Red Dawn” (1984), and teases out some of the details of the movie that speak to the apocalyptic mood that existed in the early 1980s, when relations between the United States and the Soviet Union were at their nadir. The film’s principal themes of readiness and sacrifice are as relevant to today’s world as they were 35 years ago.

NATO and Canada NATO Operations Uncategorized

Eyes East: Bringing “Vostok 2018” into Focus

Russia and China and Mongolia, oh my! Russia recently conducted its largest war games since Soviet times, in Siberia, and Chinese and Mongolian units participated. What should NATO make of this? Justin Dell argues that these exercises are probably more about Russian self-assertion in the Far East than about building a Russian-Chinese axis of autocracy.

NATO and Canada NATO Operations

Special Report on NATO and Russia: The More Things Change

The collapse of communism, signalled by the breakup of the USSR in 1991, was a welcome development for the democratic world. However, it did not have the potential to change the relationship between NATO and Russia as much as might have been hoped, as Justin Dell explains in this special report.