A Shifting Global Economy, Part 2: Closing the Doors on an Open World?

This podcast is Part 2 in a series on “A Shifting Global Economy,” which engages our researchers in International Business and Economics on changes in the global economy driven by political, social, technological and other global trends. You can check out Part 1 here, Part 3 here, and Part 4 here. Listen now as our analysts talk about the idea of openness – what it means to have open borders, open trade, openness to ideas – and how the level of openness in a society may impact its economic structure.far

 

Listen Here:

 

Sources:

  • A short example of ethno-nationalism in Europe (CEJISS)

  • 2nd and 3rd generation immigrants’ authenticity of religious practice (Academic article, click here for abstract: Voas, David, and Fenella Fleischmann. “Islam moves west: Religious change in the first and second generations.” Annual Review of Sociology 38 (2012): 525-545.)

  • Turkey’s relationship with the European Union (Brookings Institute)

  • “Are We Ready for the Coming ‘Age of Abundance’?” with Dr. Michio Kaku on the weakness of the American education system and dependence on foreign student visas (Watch a clip of the talk here)

  • The impact of international students on British universities and economy (The Guardian)

  • Greece’s dependence on the European Central Bank (Council on Foreign Relations)

 

About our Contributors:

Brad Stollery is a Junior Research Fellow with the NATO Association of Canada, focusing primarily on the International Business & Economics section. He has a BA in Political Studies (Economics minor) from the University of Alberta, and an MA in Political Science from Carleton University. In addition to his fellowship with the NAOC Brad runs a personal blog where he writes about politics and economics, and has published articles in the Edmonton Journal and Calgary Herald. In his free time he enjoys playing soccer and poker, and taking fantasy sports way too seriously. You can contact him at bradstollery@gmail.com.

 

 

 


Nilum Panesar is a perpetual learner who is continually looking to expand her horizons. She recently completed her masters in sociology at York University studying identity politics of second generation cultural youth in Canada. While serving as principal investigator on a research project on refugee arrivals in Canada, Nilum developed a deep interest in innovative research methodologies and is looking to use her skills and experience towards a career as a research analyst. She holds deep research interests in identity politics, multicultural dialogue and international development and is eager to write and learn about these and other important issues of global concern.

 

 


Ross Linden-Fraser is a Junior Research Fellow at the NATO Association of Canada, writing mainly on international business and economics. Since completing degrees in International Relations at Western University and the London School of Economics, he has lived and worked in Edinburgh, Scotland. Having worked in maritime shipping and the engineering sector, Ross has a special interest in international and interdisciplinary communication (and a firm belief in bilingualism). If he isn’t at his desk, he is probably in a canoe, on the fencing piste, or outdoors, camera in hand. Ross can be reached at rlindenfraser@gmail.com.

 

 

 


Megan Robinson is a Commerce student at the Asper School of Business at the University of Manitoba with a major in International Business and a minor in Russian and Spanish languages. Megan is currently the Sponsorship Director for the Polar Bear Formula 1 Racing Team at the University of Manitoba’s chapter of the Society of Automotive Engineers. She has been involved in archaeological research projects concerning the Iron Age in Northern England. Megan is passionate about her studies and research in International Business, and has furthered her knowledge as a Marketing Research Assistant. Megan enjoys volunteering her time at the Winnipeg Art Gallery and at international events such as the Women’s World Cup. Megan can be contacted via email at megan_a_robinson@hotmail.com.

 

 


Disclaimer: Any views or opinions expressed in articles are solely those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the NATO Association of Canada.

Philip Rafalko

About Philip Rafalko

Philip Rafalko holds a BA in Politics & Governance from Ryerson University, and an MA in Political Science from the University of Toronto, specializing in Political Economy of International Development. His main areas of interest include global governance, social conflict, systemic inequality, and human security. As Director of International Business and Economics, Philip hopes to show the connections between economic, political, and social aspects of security. A believer in social activism and learning through doing, he has volunteered in the education sector in Tanzania and has worked to engage Canadians about the history of colonialism and Indigenous peoples. His hobbies include playing and listening to music, doing martial arts, and visiting new places both near and far. He can be contacted at philrafalko@gmail.com.