Eseosa Orumwense-Lawrence recently graduated from the University of Toronto Scarborough, earning an Honours Bachelor of Science degree in Political Science and Psychology. Her academic journey has fueled a deep interest in international affairs, law & public policy, and Canadian government and politics, which she actively pursues in her research. Currently, Eseosa is engaged in a Junior Research Fellowship at the NATO Association of Canada, focusing on the intricate relationship between NATO and Canada. Although born in the United States, she grew up in Canada and currently resides in Toronto. Beyond her academic pursuits, Eseosa finds fulfillment in her creative endeavors, including music production, writing, and singing.
NATO and Canada

Canada’s Relationship with the United States: A National Security Perspective

This article looks at Canada’s proactive measures in the aftermath of 9/11, such as increased national security spending, efforts to protect critical infrastructure, and collaboration with the US, while also addressing the strain on US-Canada relations during the Trump administration

NATO and Canada

Assessing NATO’s Interventions in Afghanistan and Libya

This article examines NATO’s involvement in Afghanistan and Libya, assessing the motives and effectiveness of these interventions. Criticisms include a lack of coordination with stakeholders and potential economic conflicts among participating NATO members. The interventions aimed to promote security and stability but faced challenges. Lessons learned highlight the need for nuanced and context-dependent approaches in peace-building operations. The long-term impact of these interventions and their effectiveness remain subjects of ongoing debate.

NATO and Canada

Canada, NATO, and Collaborative Partnerships for Global Security and Peace with Inter-Governmental Organizations (IGOs)

The collaboration of NATO with various intergovernmental organizations (IGOs) such as the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), the Arab League, and the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) is examined in this article. It emphasizes Canada’s participation in these collaborations, such as election observation missions, security measures in Iraq, peace efforts in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, counternarcotics initiatives, and support for drug treatment facilities in Central Asia, highlighting the importance of NATO’s engagement with IGOs in advancing collective defence and promoting peace and security globally.