Caleigh Wong is a Junior Research Fellow for the NATO Association of Canada’s Women in Security Program. She also serves as a reservist in the Canadian Armed Forces and has deployed overseas to Latvia on Operation Reassurance. In both her work as a solider and as a Junior Fellow, Caleigh works to shed light on the experience of women in the Armed Forces and the integral role they play in the global security order. She is currently in her last year of her concurrent degrees program at Dalhousie University in International Development Studies and Civil Engineering. You can contact her at caleigh.wong@dal.ca
Canadian Armed Forces NATO and Canada Women in Security

Intersectionality and Lived Experience in the CAF: The Role of Identity in Institutional Legitimacy

Intersectionality and lived experience, though standard concepts within many policy areas, has been largely absent from military diversity and inclusivity initiatives. In this article, Caleigh Wong explores the Canadian Armed Forces’ current leadership crisis through this lens to understand how a broader understanding of identity may help inform long-overdue institutional reform.

Women in Security

Unpacking the Debate on Gender-Neutral Conscription: The Sweden Case

In this article, Caleigh Wong investigates the debate surrounding female conscription and Sweden, one of the few countries who has incorporated it into their defence policy. The Sweden case study offers justification for this practice through both a gender parity and operational effectiveness lens, but also presents shortcomings in its ability to meaningfully contribute to true equality.

Caleigh Wong Women in Security

A Turning Point for the Canadian Armed Forces: What this Means at Home and Abroad

The current institutional crisis underway in the Canadian Armed Forces is not only a domestic issue with extensive human costs for servicewomen and men, but a potential threat to broader Canadian international defense capabilities. In this article Caleigh Wong discusses the current investigation into sexual misconduct in the military and what this means for an organization crucial to upholding Canada’s democracy.