Drawing lines in the sand: why partitioning Syria may be the only means to managing an enduring civil war

With over five years of bloodshed on all fronts of the Syrian civil war, and with no reasonable solution in sight, Jayson Derow analyzes whether the separation of ethnic groups through de facto partition is a feasible strategy to manage ethnic conflict, or is such an approach actually a conflict waiting to happen?

How to DIY a Free (or Cheaper) “Degree” in IR, Part 3: Conflict and Other Thematic Concentrations

This is the third installment of an ongoing series on creating a DIY IR “degree” through free Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) and academic resources. Building on the foundational materials in Part 1 and the regional concentrations in Part 2, this part will suggest thematic concentrations in particularly salient issues in international relations.   War […]

Threats to Canada’s Security: Assured Access to the Global Commons (Part II/III)

As seen in recent years, modern war zones are rife with hybrid threats and belligerent groups that adhere less to international norms and bodies than their ideological motivations. Matthew Sherlock-Hubbard and Marko Babic discuss why Canada must engage with partners across the world to work together in confronting security challenges to Canada, its Allies, and other nations and peoples in need.

Democracy at the Point of Bayonets: Can Regime Change Stabilize Syria?

Western military forces have demonstrated that they are effective in implementing regime change. But such regimes failed to foster stability or eradicate jihadist extremism, and thus, war persists and blood is still spilt. Jayson Derow discusses why the overthrowing of the Assad government will not ease tensions within the Syrian civil war or the battle against ISIS.