Can A Multilateral Security Organization, Modeled on NATO, Be Established in Northeast Asia?

NATO has always been a collective defence organization, aimed at repelling an external threat to Alliance members. However, ever since the Harmel Report of 1967, and certainly since the end of the Cold War, NATO’s purview has widened to include a much more prominent diplomatic role, related to a much broader understanding of what constitutes a security concern, without compromising its original mission. Changsung Lee considers whether this latter-day understanding of NATO’s purpose might serve as a template for a future multilateral security structure in Northeast Asia that could facilitate a rules-based order in that region, and perhaps help catalyze the reunification of the Korean Peninsula.

Woodrow Wilson and World War I, One Hundred Years On

On the centenary of the end of World War I, people from democratic societies should look back and appreciate how much they have benefited from the rules-based international order that was proposed by Woodrow Wilson after that conflict. Justin Dell looks at what the world stands to lose if Wilson’s legacy is discarded in favour of a return to an anarchic world of great-power rivalry.

Lessons from the Canada-Spain Turbot War: A Cautionary Tale of Multilateral Governance

In 1995, Canada and Spain entered into a maritime dispute off the eastern coast of Canada. Canadian warships intercepted and seized Spanish fishing vessels not obeying the quotas of multilateral institutions tasked with fostering intergovernmental cooperation in the area. This conflict, dubbed the Turbot War, is an example of Canada use of unilateral force when multilateralism fell short. Lessons from this case should be applied to the changing Far North.